Five Tips for Big Bird: How to Save and Spend Money

Big Bird-FB Pictures, Images and PhotosAfter watching the presidential debate, are you wondering what kind of impact this will have on your wallet?

Are you trying to decipher how each candidate’s plan is going to affect you, your family and the rest of

America’s money? No matter what the politicians decide or who gets elected, we only have so much control.

Based on the information, we vote for who we believe has the better plan and  hope that it’s all going to

workout.  Don’t get too worried though. Sunny days will keep the clouds away with these tips. Big Bird, if

you’re listening, I think you should take notes just in case you are out of work.

Here are Tips I Would Give to Big Bird

to Decide How to Save and Spend Money:

1. Take a look at your spending plan.

Give yourself a financial check up. If you use websites like Mint.com to keep track of your spending, having the reminders sent to you may be just what you the doctor ordered to keep you on track. It will also provide pie charts to analyze your spending. As a teacher, I know that visuals have a strong impact. When you see that one piece of the pie is a little too big, it’s very obvious what category needs to change. I also like PowerWallet and PayOff for reaching your financial goals. They are both very easy to set up. I find them less overwhelming especially for  those who are just getting started with budgets and financial goal-setting. From a teacher’s perspective, the websites are designed well and the directions are extremely easy to follow.

2. “He who knows others is wise, he who knows himself is enlightened.” Lao Tzu

Be honest. Do you know yourself when it comes to spending? It’s easy to point out what others do wrong but do we take a look in the mirror. We all have guilty pleasures. We just want to make sure we don’t go overboard. Know your spending personality helps you to figure out your spending triggers. We all have them. It doesn’t mean you have to completely deprive yourself. Just cut back a bit.  

I know my weakness is tickets to concerts and shows. I like to see AT LEAST one show a year. If my husband and I go together, we try to have friends or family watch our kids to save on babysitting. If we can’t find a sitter, sometimes we will attend the event with a friend. This way we spend half the amount of money and still have a good time. It works out because sometimes we secretly don’t want to see what the other one likes. While saving money, you get to nurture your friendships and individual interests. We are kicking ourselves that we didn’t think of this sooner.

3. Cut it out!

If you still need ideas, I always check variable expenses. Use the Receipt Reference Technique so you don’t waste food. Another option is to get advice from the super frugal. I could never live like the Duggars, but maybe I would incorporate a tip or two.  If you’re a parent, be creative. Learn from other parents who make ends meet and still manage to have fun along the way. Check out websites like TheCentsibleLifeThe Mighty Bargain Hunter, and PennyPinchinMom.

4.Try One Tip Per Week

Ramit Sethi does this when teaching people how to use  The Scrooge Strategy. He explains how his weekly tips serve as “a little kick in the butt”  to keep you on track. You can also use one tip a week from this post,  52 ideas to make extra cash,  let’s just say. . .you’re good for the year! If too many tips give you analysis paralysis, causing you to shut down and not do anything, pick a few that work for you and stick with them. The concept of less is more applies to money saving tips too, especially if you choose ones that give you the most benefit.

5. So You Think You Can Freelance

Freelancing is another option. Research as much as you can to supplement your income. Check out sites like Elance and Odesk. Do you want to be a freelance writer? Learn from someone who already does what you want to do. Luckily, writer, Miranda Marquit shares advice about freelancing on her blog, PlantingMoneySeeds. Also look for videos and presentations on the topic. Do you want a blog? Make sure it’s not lousy. Listen to Eric Rossenberg below to find out how.



 

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7 Comments

  1. Man, I don’t know how much I’ve spent in my lifetime in concert tickets. I don’t regret what I’ve spent but I definitely could have cut back a few and used the money in better ways.

    Reply
  2. Knowing your spending triggers can help you figure out where a lot of your money is disappearing. Sometimes we just buy stuff because we’re feeling stressed out or depressed or hungry, etc. And often the spending is on things we didn’t really need or want.

    Reply
  3. admin

     /  November 4, 2012

    My triggers happen at the mall and through Ticket Master emails.

    Reply
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